The Talking Stick Blog

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MAKER: Paper People & Paper Pressings

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Paper People & Paper Pressings

February 21, 2014

Whew...that's a lot of P's! I have been wanting to introduce more creative activities in our Maker Class. Projects with no real defined "goal" per se but with interesting materials that can allow our young people to make things they can be proud of. I found this shaving cream activity to be just the thing to kick things off.
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With shaving cream as a canvas for food dye, we used paint brushes, paper clips, and even paper towel rolls to manipulate the colors throughout our milky landscape. The shaving cream was a great sensory experience as some children just wanted to mix the colors by hand. Once we were happy with our design, an index card was placed on top of the shaving cream and pressed gently into the mix. After peeling back the card, and wiping away excess shaving cream, the design is transferred from the cream to the card. Their results were fantastic!

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Following a brief snack break, we began a second activity involving that glorious material, paper. I have heard many young people debate the "awesome-ness" that is Minecraft several times while at Talking Stick. So after some perusing around the net I stumbled upon an excellent YouTube video that led me to the website Pixel Paper Craft. The site allows Minecraft users to transform their character into a 3D model using their Minecraft username. If they don't have a username the site provides hundereds of templates that can be printed and folded right from your home computer and printer. The intricate folding and gluing of this activity definitely tested our small motor skills and I can happily say everyone was able to stick with their project and proudly finish their character. Here are some examples:

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Afterwards a few of the children wanted to design their own characters. By tracing the necessary shapes of the body parts, they were able to draw and color their character they way they saw fit. It was a great extension of the original idea and a "cherry on top" of another great Maker Class.